Releases

Response to the L.A. Times – 1/17/24

Response to the L.A. Times – 1/17/24 An LA Times article on 1-17-24 regarding a state water-saving plan pursues an outdated line of thought that tries to pit urban water users against farms. The only way we adjust to water shortages and climate change is working together, not picking winners and losers. And that’s exactly what California farms have been doing. According to the Public Policy Institute (PPIC) overall farm water use is down 15% since 1980 due to implementation of conservation measures and utilization of new technology. In addition, California farmers have pioneered urban-rural partnerships which have led to hundreds of thousands of acre-feet of water being shifted from farms to California families, taking pressure off the entire system. And

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CFWC Blog

Farm Water Cafe

From our dinner to our data centers, everything has a water footprint. Find out more about how much water it takes to grow our food or charge our cars with this infographic. 

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CFWC Blog

Coping With Weather Whiplash – Improving S2S Precipitation Forecasting

Guest Post by Jeanine Jones, Interstate Resources Manager, California Department of Water Resources Water Year 2023 was notable for ending the 2020 – 2022 drought, California’s driest consecutive three-year period, with one of the state’s snowiest years. This rapid change in water supply conditions was not predicted by the National Weather Service (NWS), reflecting the difficulty of forecasting precipitation outcomes at time scales longer than a weather forecast (at most, ten days to two weeks). Subseasonal to seasonal forecasts, or S2S (forecasts extending from two weeks to a year or more) would be hugely useful for managing the extremes of floods and droughts if the forecasts were skillful. The NWS has been issuing S2S outlooks since the mid-1990s, but the outlooks cannot be

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Releases

Comment Letter – Sacramento/Delta Draft Staff Report

Comment Letter – Sacramento/Delta Draft Staff Report  Dear Chair Esquivel and Board Members: I am writing on behalf of the members of the California Farm Water Coalition (Coalition) to express our support for the alternative proposal, the “Agreements to Support Healthy Rivers and Landscapes,” to the SWRCB staff recommendation for unimpaired flows. This alternative is a more promising avenue for achieving a balanced and sustainable water management strategy for California. First, we support the emphasis on collaboration over regulation in these agreements. Unlike the more rigid mandates proposed by the Board’s staff, these agreements encourage stakeholders to work together, fostering shared responsibility. This approach promotes inclusivity and cooperation, providing a platform for finding solutions that meet both environmental needs and the

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CFWC Blog

Where Does It Go?

Water used to grow farm products doesn’t stay on the farm. It becomes part of the food we eat and the clothing we wear.    California is a net importer of the water needed to feed and clothe our population. 

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STATEMENT: The Sacramento Valley Shows There’s a Better Way to Manage Water

STATEMENT: The Sacramento Valley Shows There’s a Better Way to Manage Water October 1 marked the beginning of the new water year in California. And while 2023 provided an abundant amount of water, anyone who lives here knows we can’t assume 2024 will be the same. In fact, the only thing we know for certain is that our water supply is utterly unpredictable. California’s droughts and floods have always been cyclical but it is never certain when that cycle will shift. While this pattern has not changed, unfortunately, neither has the way we deal with our variable water supply, and it very much needs to change. All of California must share our available water. Not just farms, families, and businesses, but

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Brandon

Farm Water Cafe

From our dinner to our data centers, everything has a water footprint. Find out more about how much water it takes to grow our food or charge our cars with this infographic. 

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